How to Sew Elastic Directly to Fabric Full Guide of 2021

5 min


Elastics in making waistbands for clothing. However, on certain occasions you may need elastic to create fitted cuffs on shirts so that it fits snugly in all the fitting parts of a garment.

But elastic in a garment sewing is not the same as how you normally sew. Consider the amount of stretch it can provide to your clothes.[1965900]You can easily sew the elastic directly into the fabric. Why? Because it is one of the best ways to collect the material.

It is not as easy as it seems, learn a few steps. In this blog you will learn how to sew elastic directly onto fabric.

How to sew elastic directly onto fabric?

Sewing elastic directly onto fabric is possible by wrapping the elastic around corners. If you’re sewing stretchy knit fabric, you can use this technique for waistbands and necklines.

It’s also something I do when making diapers! You should only sew about 1/4″ from the edge of the elastic so it doesn’t create bulk when sewn onto other fabrics or seams. This tutorial shows you how to do this in four easy steps!

Step 1

Cut a piece of your elastic about an inch wide, long enough to go around what you also sew, with some length left at each end.

You want this excess on both ends or else there will be no stretches one side down as close to the edge without crocheting other layers below or moving off the edge.

Step

Lay dust on the table; you want to make sure it is flat and smooth, so if there are wrinkles or bumps in it, smooth them out before continuing.[1965901]Place the elastic right side down along one edge with a little at each end. n of the elastic together at a point about an inch from where they to the edge of your fabric.

Step 3

Take a needle and thread or a sewing machine. Pull it through the elastic where you pulled up both sides to a point. Sew all the way around the point until you are back at your starting point.

Step 4

Take the end of your elastic and fold it over at each end. You’ll want this excess on both ends because it won’t stretch!

Sew one side down as close to the edge as possible without crocheting other layers below or from the edge.

Finish both ends with a straight stitch to be safe. Add one inch to this measurement and cut your elastic with an extra length of four centimeters.

Step 5[1965900]You can also make loops to hide the ends on either side – fold over each end about two inches above the measurement you got in the previous step.[1965901]Sew one side of the elastic to make a loop and sew both ends securely for extra security.[196590]Step 6[1965903]Pin and sew all around, exactly against the circle shape you made with the seam allowance that is appropriate for your fabric. It is important to secure the stitch to the edge of the elastic.[1965904]Step 7[1965905]I make like a second row of stitches around my circle, but no need to add security – any stitch in this area will do.[1965906]Step 8[1965907]Use your scissors to trim excess fabric, then remove the pins as you go.[1965908]Geef give yourself some time before removing them so they don’t snap back into place when pressed against other fabrics or surfaces; use clothespins instead![1965909]What do you need?

These are the few things you need to prepare before starting the process:

  • Fabric[1965903]Elastic
  • Pins
  • Ruler or straight edge
  • Sewing machine and thread that match the color of the fabric.

The thread should be strong enough for the type of elastic you are using. I recommend something like nylon/polyester so it won’t break if pulled too tight

Different types of stitches for elastic

There are three main stitches you can make when sewing elastic to fabric:

The overlook stitch

This is a very simple stitch that will hold the elastic in place as you sew. You do this by taking a few stitches in the same direction as your elastic, and then sewing perpendicular to it (join it).

You can tell from this stitch that it’s not really meant to be a fixation on itself.[1965904]The Linger Stitch

You can make this stitch by taking a bedpan or blind hem stitch and anchoring it to one end of the elastic thread.

Next you take two parallel sting stitches over the top of these anchors and continue until you reach the other side.

The key here is that you sew lines both above and below your elastic so there will be no pull through once they in place with pins.

The basting stitch

The basting stitch stands out as long single stitches used to hold fabrics together before the last seams come off. In this stitch, catch the fabric on either side of your elastic and pull it tight to secure it.

The Linger Stitch

This stitch by taking a bottom stitch or blind hem stitch and anchoring it to one end of the elastic thread.

Then take two parallel basting over the top of these anchors and continue until you reach the other side.

The key here is that you sew lines both above and below your elastic so there will be no pulling through either side once secured with pins.[1965905]Blind hem stitch

If you want to make Blindheim stitches, you must take a basting stitch (or basting stitch) from the wrong side of the fabric, then fold it to the right side.

You will do a second basting stitch on the right side of the fabric and pull it taut to hold it in place.

Filter stitch

Yo you can make a catch stitch by taking a cloud stitch or zigzag stitch and attach one end to your elastic anchor wire. Next, take two parallel stitches under this first anchor point until you reach the other end of the elastic thread.

Pleat stitch

This stitch by taking a basting stitch on the right side of the fabric and then folding it to the wrong side.

You are doing an equal number of stitches WS to hold the panel in place and flat against your head or neck until you reach your elastic thread.

You will then take a single basting stitch on the wrong side of the fabric, pull it tight to hold it in place.

Learn more about[]How to attach” Sewing tutorials[1965906]Elastic Threads

The first step in attaching elastic directly to fabric is to pin the elastic to your fabric. it flat against your head or neck until you reach your elastic thread.

You then take a single basting stitch on the wrong side of the fabric, pulling it tight around it on its place.

Sewing elastic to a seam

This by your clothing or style preference and the type of fabric you are using.

Sewing elastic threads

The first step to attach elastic directly to fabric, is by pinning the elastic to your fabric and holding it flat against your head or neck until you reach your elastic thread.

You then take a single basting stitch on the wrong side of the fabric, pull it tight to hold it in place.

Sewing elastic threads to the front

The first step to attaching elastics directly to fabric is to pin the elastic to your fabric, holding it flat against your head or n en hold until you reach your elastic thread.[1965907]You will then take a single basting stitch on the wrong side of the fabric, pull it tight to secure it.

Which is the best fabric for sewing elastic?

There are two types of fabric you can use: woven and knitted. The type of fabric determines how you can sew elastic directly onto it, so it’s important to know the difference.

Woven fabric has a tight weave with horizontal and vertical threads; knit fabric has only vertical threads.

Do you stretch elastic when sewing?

Elastic stretches when sewing sewing elastic to knit fabric, but not woven. It depends on the width of the elastic – if it is narrow it will also stretch when sewn on both fabrics, but if it is wide and you sew on woven fabric, it will not stretch.

What are the best sewing machine settings for elastic?

The weight of your fabric will determine which sewing machine settings you should use. When sewing with woven fabric, set your machine for a zigzag stitch on the widest possible setting, and using thick elastic threads is best.

If you are sewing with knit fabric, use the standard zigzag stitch and a thin elastic thread to prevent the seams on the sides of the garment from puckering or stretching.[1945900]


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